E-Cigarettes

WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THIS NEW TOBACCO PRODUCT

 

E-cigarettes or vapes use a heating element to aerosolize a liquid that usually contains nicotine. This liquid is sold in thousands of flavors. While the long-term health effects of vaping are unknown, there is evidence that nicotine can affect the developing brain, making it important to prevent youth use. For more information on nicotine and the developing brain, see Youth and Nicotine.

Although the long-term health effects are unknown, there is evidence that vaping is not harmless and contains toxic chemicals. In Utah, approximately 10.5% of high school students report using e-cigarettes; a five-fold increase from 2011. Approximately 4.8% of Utah adults use e-cigarettes.

Research is inconclusive about whether e-cigarettes can be help smokers quit traditional cigarettes. In individual cases, e-cigarettes may help smokers quit, but only if they completely quit traditional cigarettes and ultimately quit nicotine. E-cigarettes or vapes have not been approved by the CDC as a cessation device.

Sources:

http://www.tobaccofreeutah.org/pdfs/TPCPFY%20Current%20report.pdf

http://www.tobaccofreeutah.org/pdfs/DataBrief_ECigarettesfinal.pdf

https://e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov/

https://www.cdc.gov/features/ecigarettes-young-people/

http://www.cochrane.org/CD010216/TOBACCO_can-electronic-cigarettes-help-people-stop-smoking-and-are-they-safe-use-purpose